The future of food – 6 Minute English

All Comments

  • One thing we might not be eating so much of in the future is ultra-processed food! Find out what the health hazards of ultra-processed food are in this Lingohack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ee3ZSMbOViQ&list=PLcetZ6gSk96_UR0qeay5Dh52SvAD-vmGH&index=15&t=0s

    BBC Learning English February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thank you so much

    Quyết Nguyễn Mạnh February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • This is a good topic. I love bbc learlning English.

    yesong Piano February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • the answer is a south america

    Tefa_1804 456 February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • I Love BBC learning English

    Hoàng Nguyễn February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Insects! Yummy…

    Hedgehog February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • The futurologist tcarry out their research on the basis of a hunch. They will take a deeper look into how we ingest food , and how trends and diet are formed. A lot of people latched on to this topic and a minor portion of them are too strigent

    No name Nguyễn February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thanks BBC 👍

    Chikasa February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Learning english online is becoming popular. I'm latch onto BBC learning english, particular in 6 minutes english program 🙂 I have a hunch that I will be good at english in the near future ^ ^ Thanks and greeting from VN.

    Phuong Tuyen Truong February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • 😍

    Shahin Rahman February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • BBC learning English helps me very much, I can listen better and learn more vocabulary

    olivia vivian February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Great

    Chikasa February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
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    Shamim Ahmed February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • I have a hunch that this channel will soon become a trend for learning English. Although it's challenge to digest all content it comes up. I'm latching onto it.

    Saytinh February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Latch onto
    Get sucked into
    Meet the laws
    Ingesting food

    Hoạt Hoàng Văn February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • very beateful lesson

    احمد فارس February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • bbc learning english is the best channel

    rudolf blaha February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Informative and interesting💪🏽
    I'm latching into your videos🔥

    Mirghani Hamza February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Interesting lesson, nice topic, as always!

    Alessandro Messina February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • thanks

    Thomas Yeh February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Transcript

    Note: This is not a word for word transcript

    Neil

    Hello. This is 6 Minute English. I'm Neil.

    Sam

    And I'm Sam.

    Neil

    Sam, have you considered the future of food much?

    Sam

    Well I think in the future I might have a sandwich – in about 30 minutes in the future.

    Neil

    Not quite what I meant! With the population of the world increasing along with the negative effects of climate change and other global issues, we might have to radically change our diets in the future.

    Sam

    Ah, yes I have heard about this – there are all sorts of developments from growing artificial meat to developing insect-based foods.

    Neil

    Mmm, tasty. Well we’ll look a little more at this topic shortly, but we start, as ever, with a question and it’s a food-based question. In which continent did tomatoes originate? Is it…

    A: South America

    B: Africa

    C: Asia

    What do you think, Sam?

    Sam

    No idea. I’m going to say Africa, but that’s just a guess.

    Neil

    OK. Well I will reveal the answer later in the programme. On a recent edition of BBC Radio 4’s The Food Programme there was an interview with Dr Morgaine Gaye. She is a futurologist. A futurologist is someone who studies and predicts the way we will be living in the future. Her particular area of expertise is the subject of food. What two things does she say she thinks about?

    Dr Morgaine Gaye

    As a food futurologist, I think about not just what we’re going to be eating in the future but why. Why that thing, why that trend, why will people suddenly latch onto that food, that way of eating that food at that particular time? And when I work for large companies, that’s what they want to know. There is an element of a hunch. And then proving or disproving that hunch.

    Neil

    So, what two things does she think about?

    Sam

    She says that as a food futurologist she thinks about what we will be eating in the future and also why we will be eating that food.

    Neil

    Yes, in particular she looks at why there are particular trends. A trend is what is popular now or what is becoming popular. For example, at the moment there is a trend for eating less red meat.

    Sam

    She also looks at why people latch onto particular trends. To latch onto here means to be very interested in something. So if you latch onto a particular food trend, you start to follow that trend, you might start eating that particular diet.

    Neil

    Information about future trends is very important for companies in the food business. How does she actually predict these trends?

    Sam

    She says she starts with a hunch. A hunch is a feeling you get that something is true. You don’t have any real evidence, but your experience and knowledge makes you think you might be right.

    Neil

    Let’s listen again.

    Dr Morgaine Gaye

    As a food futurologist I think about not just what we’re going to be eating in the future but why. Why that thing, why that trend why will people suddenly latch onto that food, that way of eating that food at that particular time? And when I work for large companies, that’s what they want to know. There is an element of a hunch. And then proving or disproving that hunch.

    Neil

    Dr Gaye goes on to talk about how on the subject of food, there are restrictions. Why is that?

    Dr Morgaine Gaye

    Food business of course has different restrictions around it because it’s about safety, we’re ingesting that. The supply chain and the labelling laws are very stringent especially in this country so it takes longer to get an ide­a from just a concept that’s discussed around a table to an actual production facility, labelled, branded, tested, marketed and put on the shelves.

    Neil

    So, why restrictions?

    Sam

    Well, it’s about safety. Because we are ingesting food, which is a way of saying we are putting it into our bodies, it has to be safe.

    Neil

    It can be a long process of developing a new food and getting it into the shops because of the need to be safe and meet the laws of different countries. In the UK she mentions that the food safety laws are very stringent. This means that the laws are very tough, very strict. Let’s hear Dr Gaye again.

    Dr Morgaine Gaye

    Food business of course has different restrictions around it because it’s about safety, we’re ingesting that, the supply chain and the labelling laws are very stringent especially in this country so it takes longer to get an ide­a from just a concept that’s discussed around a table to an actual production facility, labelled, branded, tested, marketed and put on the shelves.

    Neil

    Right, well before we review our vocabulary, let’s get the answer to the question. In which continent did tomatoes originate? Is it…

    A: South America

    B: Africa

    C: Asia

    Sam, what did you say?

    Sam

    I made a guess at Africa.

    Neil

    Well, I’m afraid that’s not right. Congratulations though to everyone who said South America. Right, let’s recap today’s words and expressions.

    Sam

    OK, well we started with the word futurologist. This is a noun to describe someone who studies and predicts the way we will be living in the future.

    Neil

    Then we had trend. This word can describe what is popular now and the way in which what is popular is changing. For example now we are seeing a trend for eating less red meat in some parts of the world.

    Sam

    If you latch onto something, you become interested in it and associate yourself with it – we heard that people very quickly latch onto food trends

    Neil

    Then there was hunch. A hunch is a feeling about something you think might be true even though you don’t have real evidence for it. Ingesting something means taking it into your body, so eating or drinking it.

    Sam

    And finally a stringent rule is a very strict rule, a tough rule or law which in connection to food is designed to make sure it is safe and of a suitable quality.

    Neil

    OK, thank you, Sam. That’s all from 6 Minute English. Goodbye!

    Sam

    Bye!

    임형규 February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • There are a lot of useful vocabularies in this video ! Well- done ! thanks so much, BBC <3

    Nguyen Minh Thao February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • I am latch onto a certain kind of music.

    Riley Kovacs February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thank you, BBC. 💚

    tgchan February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • The lesson is useful. I like the lesson like that. I think if BBC post transcripts of video , it is greater. I practice listening skill, then i summarize main idea, finally i check with transcript. Therefore i will know my fault. Thank you very much 😁

    Ngọc Yến February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thanku so much for sharing such useful videos..❤❤❤

    Vinita Rai February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thanks

    MENTORES PARA VIDA February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • 1.25 rap

    Star Patrick February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thank you!

    Ahil Kannan February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Amazing topic. Thanks BBC

    Aref wahb February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • I’m french and I think it would be a great thing if you display in the video the different words you teach us
    Thank you !

    Deadbye3 February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply
  • Thank you , today i've learnt about particular things : consider , shortly :))) Many thanks and big help !

    Bright Hub February 12, 2020 1:03 am Reply

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